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Ashton Nevada

Ashton, a little-known blip on the historical map of Nevada, offers a glimpse into the less celebrated aspects of railroad history. Located near Beatty, this site functioned as a modest water stop on the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad, serving a crucial yet understated role in the days of steam locomotives.

Ashton Nevada

Ashton Nevada Overview

In the vast expanse of Nye County, Nevada, Ashton emerged not as a bustling town or a mining camp, but as a necessary, albeit minor, cog in the machinery of the early 20th-century railroad industry. Its role was simple yet essential, providing water to the steam engines that traversed the arid landscapes of the American Southwest. However, Ashton’s fate was closely tied to the railroad, and its disappearance mirrored the decline of the rail line it served.

Learn more about Ghost Town in Nevada and Ghost Towns in the Southwest.

Learn more about Nye County:
The History of Nye County
Things to Do in Nye County, Nevada
View books on Nye County, Nevada

Year Established/Founded

Unknown, but associated with the operation period of the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad.

Ashton Nevada History

Ashton’s history is marked by its role as a water stop on the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad. Unlike other towns that grew around mining or commercial activities, Ashton never developed beyond its singular purpose. Its existence was directly linked to the operational needs of the railroad.

After scouring old newspapers and books, I didn’t find anything of significance to share about the ghost town of Ashton which was a stop on the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad (T&T).

There are no remains of the area to show its existence.

From the resource, A Cultural Resource Overview for the Amargosa Mohave Basin Planning Units:

A list of the stops along the Tonopah and Tidewater in 1939, at the end of its career, includes Ludlow, Broadwell, Mesquite, Crucero, Rasor, Soda, Baker, Silver Lake, Riggs, Valjean, Dumont, Sperry, Acme, Tecopa, Zabriskie, Shoshone, Gerstley, Evelyn, Death Valley Junction, Bradford, Scranton, Jenifer, Leeland, Ashton, Carrara, and Beatty. Scranton was the last stop in California. The more important stops on the line were Ludlow, Silver Lake, Tecopa, Shoshone, and Death Valley Junction.

Timeline

  • Early 20th Century: Ashton functions as a water stop for the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad.
  • Post-Railroad Era: The site is abandoned after the railroad discontinues its operations.

Mines

None, as Ashton was not a mining town.

Railroads

Served as a water stop on the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad.

Post Office

No post office was established in Ashton.

View the list and history of Nevada Post Offices.

Newspaper

None

Learn more about Nevada Newspapers

The Population of Ashton Nevada

Unknown at this time.

Elevation

2,664′

Location

Its location was approximately 16 miles southwest of Beatty, Nevada, 82 miles southeast of Goldfield, Nevada, and 87 miles southeast of Lida, Nevada.

Location of Ashton between other Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad stations:

  • Leeland (MP 144.51)
  • Ashton (MP 154.98)
  • Carrara (MP 160.55)
ashton nevada
1907 Map – Image from Wikipedia Images

GPS Coordinates

36°43’13″N 116°40’24″W

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Today, Ashton is but a memory, a small footnote in the history of Nevada’s railroads. Its story reminds us of the numerous transient sites that dotted the landscape, each playing a small yet vital role in the era of steam trains, now vanished without a trace.

Photos and Videos

None at this time.

References Used

Ashton Nevada