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Beatty Nevada (Center of the Gold Railroads – “Chicago of the West”) 

Beatty, unlike many of its neighboring ghost towns in Nye County, Nevada, has defied the typical boom-and-bust narrative of mining communities. Established in the early 20th century as a railroad and mining hub, Beatty has evolved into a resilient town, continuing to thrive well into the modern era.

Learn more about Nye County:
The History of Nye County
Things to Do in Nye County, Nevada
View books on Nye County, Nevada

Beatty Nevada

Beatty Nevada Overview

Situated at the crossroads of the Bullfrog Mining District, Beatty’s early history is intertwined with the gold rush frenzy that swept through the region. Its strategic location near the Montgomery Shoshone mine and along the Bullfrog Goldfield Railroad made it a vital center for supplies and transportation. Over the years, Beatty has adapted to changing times, transitioning from a mining-centric economy to a community sustained by diverse industries and tourism.

Beatty was the center of three short-lived, so-called “gold” railroads that were spawned by early 1900s strikes in Tonopah, Goldfield, and Rhyolite.

The town was referred to as the “Chicago of the West.”

Category

  • Mining
  • Railroad

Marker Type

Blue marker

Nevada Historical Marker Number

Beatty Nevada is Nevada Historical Marker #173.

Click here to view the complete list of Nevada State Historical Markers.

County

Nye County, Nevada

GPS Coordinates

36.905963, -116.755789

Nevada Historical Marker Transcription

Beatty was the center of three short-lived, so-called “gold” railroads that were spawned by early 1900s strikes in Tonopah, Goldfield and Rhyolite.  The town was referred to as the “Chicago of the West”.

Between 1906 and 1907, railroad companies constructed the Las Vegas and Tonopah from Las Vegas through Beatty and Rhyolite to Goldfield, the Bullfrog Goldfield Railroad from Goldfield to Beatty and Rhyolite, and the Tonopah and Tidewater from Ludlow, California to Tonopah.  The last of these used the Bullfrog Goldfield tracks to Beatty and Rhyolite until 1914.  The rails were torn up at Beatty beginning on July 18, 1942.

STATE HISTORICAL MARKER No.  173

STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE

BEATTY LIONS CLUB FOR FRANK BROCKMAN

References Used

Beatty Nevada