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Frank Ahlers

The life of Frank Ahlers, spanning from 1886 to 1907, encapsulates a poignant and brief journey through the historical backdrop of Nevada’s evolution. Born into a family deeply rooted in Lander County, Nevada, Frank’s life was shaped by both personal milestones and familial ties, amidst the dynamic changes of the American West.

Frank Ahlers Overview

Frank Ahlers’ life, though short-lived, was marked by familial bonds, personal struggles, and the changing tides of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Nevada. His life, from his birth in Austin to his untimely death in Nye County, was intertwined with significant familial events and the challenges of the era.

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Birth

March 19, 1886, in Austin, Lander County, Nevada

Marriage

Unknown. Due to age and no reference mentioned in newspapers, he was probably not married.

Death

April 7, 1907, in Nye County, Nevada

Family

  • Parents: Frederick William Ahlers (1842–1897) and Lizzie Ermina Hunt Fuller (1851–1910).
  • Siblings: Emma Frances (1873–1875), Martha E (1877–1941), Matilda (1879–1953), Frederick W. “Fred” (1880–1953), Lizzie H. (1882–1894), Bertha B. (1884–1918), Helena (1888–1983), and Oliver I. C. (1890–1945).
  • Spouse: None.
  • Children: None.

Timeline

  • March 19, 1886: Born in Austin, Lander County, Nevada.
  • March 1888: Birth of sister Helena Ahlers.
  • March 1890: Birth of brother Oliver I. C. Ahlers.
  • November 24, 1894: Death of sister Lizzie H. Ahlers.
  • November 24, 1897: Death of father Frederick William Ahlers.
  • 1900: Residence in Hess, Lander, Nevada.
  • April 6-13, 1907: Series of events leading to Frank’s death in Nye County, Nevada, involving a robbery and subsequent suicide.

Places Lived

Mainly in Lander County, Nevada, with notable residence in Hess, Lander, Nevada in 1900.

Cemeteries

Photos and Videos

WAS HELD UP: THEN SUICIDES FRANK AHLERS, A TEAMSTER. SHOOTS HIMSELF IN FOREHEAD. Frank Ahlers, a teamster from Manhattan, committed suicide about 12:30 this morning in the alley be- Blde the Big Casino dance hall by shooting himself above the right eye. He was taken to the Miners’ Union Hospital, but the skill of the surgeons was inadequate to save his life. He died without regaining consciousness at 2:15 o’clock this morning.

Ahlers came from Manhattan, where he worked for Enkhouse, in charge of a ten-horse team and arrived in the city Tuesday. of natThe to night and the following he took In the sights of the town and drank freely. Last night he was fairly sober and entered the Casino about 11 o’clock to tell the bartender, George McCreary, that he had been held up at the corral below the de pot and robbed of $80. McCreary told him to make a complaint to the police and Ahlers left the hall to follow that bit of advice. In a short while he returned with two policemen who were making the rounds with him that he might endeavor to Identify his assailants, whom he was unable to describe accurately.

Just what became of the policemen during the next few moments Is not known at this writing, but about 12:30 o’clock, as Charles Miller, croupier at a roulette table In the Casino, was approaching the hall In company with two female friends he heard the report of the shot and saw the flash In the alley. It was need less to give an alarm, for In an in stant the alley was crowded and the police took charge of the wounded man and carried him to the Miners TTnlnn Hospital There was some frenzied talk at the time that It was not an attempt at suicide but was a murder. This was disproved by the finding of the revolver near where the body lay. A woman friend, who had accompanied Ahlers Tuesday and Wednes lehtH. said that she could not account for his act except that after ha hnA been on a drinking bout he always seemed greatly depressed and she supposed his depression in this case was accentuated toy his loss of money.

Frank Ahlers

DANCES THEN KILLS HIMSELF TOLD BARTENDER THAT HE HAD BEEN ROBBED Frank Ahlers, a Teamster in Manhattan, Laughs and Drinks and Then Fires Bullet Into His Brain. TONOPAH, April 8. Frank Ahlers, teamster of Manhattan, killed himself in an alley in the rear of the Big Casino dance hall early Saturday morning, after dancing for several minutes with one of the girls employed in the place. He shot himself directly over the right eye and the bullet lodged in his brain. He died a few minutes after the shot was fired.

Ahlers came from Manhattan, where he worked for Enkhouse, in charge of a ten-horse team, and arrived in the city Tuesday. That night and the following he took in the sights of the town and drank freely. Friday night he was fairly sober and entered the Casino about 11 o’clock to tell the bartender, George MeCreary, that he had been held up at the corral below the depot and robbed of $80. MeCreary told him to make a complaint to the police and Ahlers left the hall to follow that bit of advice. In a short while he returned with two policemen who were making the rounds with him that he might endeavor to identify his assailants, whom he was unable to describe accurately.

The policemen were unable to find the two men and left Ahlers in the dance hall. Ahlers bought a couple of drinks and after dancing a few minutes went into the alley, where he took his own life. His body was found by Charles Miller a croupier employed in the dance hall.

THEFT OF WATCH CAUSE OF DEATH The news has reached Reno of the funeral in Tonopah of Frank Ahlers, the young teamster who shot himself in the rear of the big Casino dance hall there a few nights ago, as told in the Gazette. The only reason which can be assigned for the young man’s act is the fact that he was robbed of his watch, chain and $80. Ahlers was the son of Mrs. E. B. Fuller of Sparks. He left three brothers. Bertha B. Ahlers, Fred W. Ahlers of Austin and Oliver I.C. Ahlers of Goldfield, ‘ and three sisters, Mrs. Martha E. Stowe of San Jose, Tillie N. Ahlers of AVashington and Mrs. Helen II. Metzler, who resides in this state. The young man was a native of Reese River, south of Austin. He was 21 years and 16 days of age.

References Used

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  •  Tonopah Bonanza, April 6, 1907, Page 1. via Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com/article/tonopah-bonanza-frank-ahlers/135612399/ : accessed November 22, 2023), clip page for Frank Ahlers
  • Reno Gazette-Journal, April 8, 1907, Page 3. via Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com/article/reno-gazette-journal-frank-ahlers/135612476/ : accessed November 22, 2023), clip page for Frank Ahlers
  • Reno Gazette-Journal, April 13, 1907, Page 5. via Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com/article/reno-gazette-journal-frank-ahlers/135612617/ : accessed November 22, 2023), clip page for Frank Ahlers