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Valley of Fire State Park Exploration Guide

Valley of Fire State Park

Valley of Fire Overview

Valley of Fire State Park is a public recreation and nature preservation area located 16 miles south of Overton, Nevada. When you drive down the highway you would never guess that down the road is an amazing geological area that offers visitors camping, hiking, geological points of interest, picnic areas, and more!!!

The state park derives its name from red sandstone formations, the Aztec Sandstone, which formed from shifting sand dunes 150 million years ago. These features, which are the centerpiece of the park’s attractions, often appear to be on fire when reflecting the sun’s rays.

Located within a 4 x 6-mile basin, it abuts the Lake Mead National Recreation Area on the east at the Virgin River confluence.

View books covering Valley of Fire on Amazon to help your trip planning.

Click here to view highly rated Valley of Fire tours.

 

Valley of Fire State Park History

It was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1968 and is Nevada’s oldest state park, as commemorated with Nevada Historical Marker #150. 

Click here to view other Nevada Historical Markers.

Timeline

  • 1865 – Paiutes were living in the area
  • 1912 – Rough road built through the area as part of the Arrowhead Trail
  • The 1920s – The name was coined by an AAA official traveling through the park at sunset.
  • The 1920s – Archeological richness and recreational possibilities of the area were recognized and about 8,500 acres of federal public domain, the original Valley of Fire tract, were given to the State of Nevada.
  • 1933 – The Civilian Conservation Corps built the first facilities and campgrounds in the park. 
  • On Easter Sunday in 1934 – Valley of Fire was formally opened as Nevada’s first state park. 
  • 1935 – Legal designation from the Nevada State Legislature
  • 1968 – Designated as a National Natural Landmark

Managed By

This list of Nevada state parks comprises protected areas managed by the U.S. state of Nevada, which include state parks, state historic sites, and state recreation areas. The system is managed by the Nevada Division of State Parks within the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR). The system manages 23 state park units, some of which have multiple units.

The Division is headquartered in Carson City and has two management regions statewide: the Northern Region (Fallon Office) and the Southern Region (Las Vegas Office).
Valley of Fire State Park

Area Size

The area of Valley of Fire State Park covers nearly 46,000 acres (19,000 ha).

Elevation

The elevation is between 1,320′ – 3,009′, depending on the area of the park.

GPS Coordinates

36.5073° N, 114.5352° W

Address

29450 Valley of Fire Hwy, Overton, NV 89040

Time Zone

Located in Overton, Nevada, which is part of the Pacific Time Zone. Click here to learn more about Southwest time zones in the area and how they may impact your travel.

How to Get to Valley of Fire State Park

Valley of Fire State Park

Depending on your starting point, the Valley of Fire is less than an hour’s drive from Las Vegas. From Las Vegas, take I-15N to exit 75 to merge onto the Valley of Fire Road.

Valley of Fire Location

The Valley of Fire State Park is located about 50 miles from the Las Vegas Strip in the Mojave Desert and 16 miles South of Overton, NV.

The park borders the Lake Mead National Recreation Area at the East entrance of the park.

How Far is Valley of Fire From Las Vegas

Valley of Fire State Park is located approximately 20 miles from Lake Mead and approximately 50 miles Northeast of Las Vegas via Interstate 15 and on exit 75. (Using the Las Vegas Strip as the center point for directions)

  • Las Vegas, NV: 45 miles / 45 minutes
  • Mesquite, NV: 51 miles / 54 minutes
  • St. George, UT: 88 miles / 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Kingman, AZ: 133 miles / 2 hours 15 minutes

Las Vegas to Valley of Fire Directions

From the Las Vegas Strip to the West Entrance

  1. Take the I-15 North approximately 35-40 miles.
  2. Then, take Exit 75 and head East toward Valley of Fire/Lake Mead.
  3. Drive approximately 17 miles on Valley of Fire to the West Entrance Station.

Las Vegas to the East Entrance

  1. Take the I-15 North to Lake Mead Boulevard.
  2. Turn Right and head East to Lakeshore Road (NV-166).
  3. Turn Right onto Northshore Drive (NV-167) and follow Northshore to the East entrance to Valley of Fire.

Hoover Dam to Valley of Fire

  1. The Hoover Dam is located approximately 64 miles from the Valley of Fire.
  2. Head northwest on Kingman Wash Access Road and continue onto Hoover Dam Access Road for 1.4 miles.
  3. Continue onto NV-172 onto US-93 N
  4. Turn right onto Lakeshore Rd
  5. Turn right onto Northshore Rd
  6. Turn left onto Valley of Fire Hwy

Map of Valley of Fire

Click here to view the Valley of Fire State Park Hikes .pdf.

Valley of Fire State Park Entry Fees

Valley of Fire Entrance Fee

The Valley of Fire is a State Park in Nevada and requires an entrance fee to enter the park.

You can pay a one-time fee or use a Nevada State Park pass if you have one. You can purchase a Nevada State Park pass at the gate or at the Valley of Fire Visitor Center.

If you pay the daily use fee and decide later in the day you want to purchase the park pass, save your receipt, and the daily use fee will be applied towards the fee for your Nevada State Park Pass.

If you arrive at the park before the booth is manned, there are envelopes available for you to add your cash to and then drop in the storage slot.

Before you drop the envelope into the slot, be sure to tear off the stub to place on your dashboard so the park rangers can match it up to the paid visitors list.

You may want to make sure you have a pen with you as sometimes the pen in the box may not work (or could be missing).

If you are camping at one of the campgrounds, there will be boxes for you to pay for your entrance fee and camping fee at the campground.

The Valley of Fire entrance fee is $10 per car and there is no longer a Nevada state residence discount.

A reminder that the Valley of Fire is a Nevada State Park and not part of the National Parks System so if you have one of the passes above, they will not be honored at the gate.

If you are a frequent Nevada State Park visitor, you should consider getting a Nevada State Park Annual Pass for $75 a year.

The Valley of Fire entrance fee is collected at the self-pay stations before the manned booths open or at the fee booth once during open hours.

Payments Accepted

On the last visit, they accepted cash, checks, and all major credit cards at the gate and at the visitor center (not sure about checks here – they accept them for camping spots and day passes).

Valley of Fire State Park Visitors Center

Valley of Fire State Park

Stop by the Valley of Fire Visitor Center to view exhibits on the geology, ecology, prehistory, and history of the park and the nearby region.

The visitor center is easily seen as soon as you turn off the Valley of Fire Highway onto Mouse’s Tank Road.

If you have your Nevada State Park Passport booklet, be sure to stop by the visitor center and get your stamp. Click here to find out where you can grab a copy of the Nevada State Park Passport booklet for free. (If you collect all 15 Nevada State Park stamps, you can turn your passport booklet in for a free annual pass!)

Visitor center information:

  • The visitor center is open daily from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.
  • The rest of the park opens at sunrise and closes at sunset.
  • Phone:  (702) 397-2088

Click here to view photos and more information on the Valley of Fire Visitor Center.

Valley of Fire Events

Check out the Valley of Fire calendar of events to find fun events from birdwatching to how to make your own petroglyph.

Valley of Fire State Park Tours

If you want to visit Valley of Fire with a tour group instead of on your own there are several to choose from.

When I was there in May 2018, there was a couple from out of town with a private tour guide with who I kept crossing paths on the different trails.

List of Valley of Fire Tours

Cell Phone Service at the Valley of Fire

cell phone service at valley of fire
If you visit the Valley of Fire State Park, just be prepared that you are going to have little to no cell phone service while at the park.

There are two “official” cell phone service areas, within the park, as seen on the map above.

I have ATT and I had cell phone service in other areas than listed above for at the first few campsites at Atlatl Rock Campground, on the summit at Top of the World (if you are hiking), and a small stretch of road on the way to the visitors center.

Click here to view an app via iTunes to view your cell phone coverage – Cell Phone Coverage Map app.

If you are an avid camper, you may want to consider a cell phone extender and booster to keep you connected while on the road.

Dogs at Valley of Fire

Dogs at Valley of Fire

Bringing your furbaby with you to the park? You can but make sure they are on a leash that is no more than 6′.

Be aware that some trails may not be suitable for a dog during the summer months due to the extremely hot sand, e.g., Rainbow Vista, Petroglyph Canyon, etc. I hiked Rainbow Vista in early June and the hot sand “splashing” against my legs at times was not a treat.

Make sure you have a good harness so your dog cant’ “wiggle” out off leash. I have to use a harness as my escape artist can be out of her leash/collar combo in a matter of seconds. I use a dog saddlebag for my dogs so they can pack in their own water, bowl, and snacks.

Dogs at Valley of Fire

My friend’s dog enjoying the shade [yes, he’s leashed – hidden for photo]

Best Time of Year to Visit the Valley of Fire State Park

The Valley of Fire State Park has a dry and warm climate typical of the Mojave Desert in which it lies. 

Winters are mild with daytime temperatures ranging from 54°F  to 75°F  and overnight lows in the mid-30°F to mid-40°F. Storms moving east from the Pacific Ocean occasionally bring rain during the winter months. 

Daily summer highs usually range from 100°F  to 115°F and occasionally reach near 120°F. A friend once commented that we camped “on the surface of the sun” one time in June when the temperatures were over 100 degrees during the day. Not going to lie, it was brutal especially when you add in the high winds blowing that hot air. Whew!

You can use either Overton, NV, or Valley of Fire State Park to check the weather. Typically, Overton, NV weather will show a few degrees higher than the Valley of Fire.

Valley of Fire State Park Weather

Valley of Fire State Park

RELATED ARTICLE >>> Hiking in the Heat – Tips to Stay Cool

  • Spring – Spring is a perfect time of year to camp and explore the Valley of Fire. With day highs and night lows, you can’t beat the temps for a great visit.
  • Summer – Daily summer highs usually range from 100°F  to 115°F and occasionally reach near 120°F. With the radiant heat from the sand and rocks, your 100-degree day feels hotter during the summer months. I would not recommend a long hike in the summer unless you are familiar with which trails will be shaded and if you start VERY early in the day to beat the heat. We did Top of the World in June but we picked a trail that kept us in the shade for most of the hike and then used our thermal umbrellas on the way back to our cars.
  • Fall – Fall is another perfect time of year to camp and hike the Valley of Fire. With day highs and night lows, you can’t beat the temps for a great visit.
  • Winter – Winters are mild with daytime temperatures ranging from 54°F  to 75°F  and overnight lows in the mid-30°F to mid-40°F.
  • Rain and Snow – The average annual precipitation is 6.50″. Storms moving east from the Pacific Ocean occasionally bring rain during the winter months. Thunderstorms from the Southwestern Monsoon can produce heavy showers during summer. During all my visits to the Valley of Fire, I have not seen snow to date. I have heard that there has been a light dusting or two but have not witnessed it for myself.

Valley of Fire State Park Cabins

Parking at Valley of Fire State Park

Normally, I have never had issues parking at any pullout or trailhead due to too many cars but I am always one of the first ones to arrive.

The areas that can be really congested are White Domes and Mouses Tank as they are very popular trail areas with great picnic facilities.

Restrooms at Valley of Fire State Park

Restrooms are scattered throughout the park and at the Valley of Fire visitors center (note, there are two areas with restrooms – one is accessible outside and the other is accessible inside the building).

Campgrounds at Valley of Fire State Park

There are two single-site campgrounds at the Valley of Fire State Park, Atlal Rock Campground (this article has detailed information specifically about each campsite), and Arch Rock Campground, for a combined total of 72 camping sites.

There is also an area for group camping behind the Beehives with 3 group campsites by reservation only.

You will need to bring what you need for camping as the amenities offered at the Valley of Fire Visitors Center are limited. The closest place to buy supplies will be within the town of Overton such as Lin’s Grocery, where I highly recommend getting an ice cream cone from the deli (they are weighed to determine the price!).

Valley of Fire Campground Details

  • All campsites are first-come-first-served. (The exception is the group camping site, which requires a reservation)
  • Most campsites are equipped with shaded tables, grills, water, and restrooms (flush toilets at Atlatl Rock and pit toilets at Arch Rock Campgrounds).
  • RV sites with power and water hookups are available at Atlatl Rock Campground for an additional fee of $10 per night.
  • A dump station and showers are available.
  • A camping limit of 14 days within a 30-day period is enforced.
  • A maximum of 2 cars, 2 tents, and 8 people per campsite for those using Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock Campgrounds.
  • There are three group areas, each accommodating up to 45 people, though parking is limited. These sites are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only.

Valley of Fire Camping Fees

  • Day use entrance fee:  $10.00 per vehicle (click here to read about the Valley of Fire entrance fees)
  • Camping at Atlatl Rock or Arch Rock Campground:  $20.00 per night
  • Water and Electric hookups: + $10.00 for sites at Atlatl Rock Campground, which are #23 – #44
  • Group Campground is a $25 reservation fee per night
  • Group Campground is $20 per car in addition to the reservation fee for each night
  • Active military is free

If you want to camp at the Valley of Fire State Park but don’t want to try your chances with the first come first serve for the individual spots, grab some friends and see if you can find dates at the Valley of Fire Group Campground.

It’s our preferred place to camp when there!

Located behind the Beehives, there are three group sites that have limited parking, a large sheltered picnic area, running water, and pit toilets. Unlike the other two campgrounds which are first come first served, these sites are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only. Each group campsite will accommodate up to 45 people.

There are two individual site campgrounds at the Valley of Fire, the Atlatl Rock Campground, and Arch Rock Campground.

In addition to these two campgrounds, there is an area for group camping that has three sites for group camping. Each site has limited parking and will accommodate up to 45 people.

Unlike the other two campgrounds which are first come first served, these sites are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only.

Call the park at (702) 397-2088 for reservations or stop by the Valley of Fire Visitor Center if you happen to be in the area for more information.

Valley of Fire Group Campground Amenities

Atlatl Rock Campground

There are 44 campsites at the Atlatl Rock Campground available on a first-come-first-served basis. Of the 44 campsites, 21 of the campsites have water and electric hookups for an additional charge of $10 per night.

  • Also, at the back of the Atlatl campground, there are three tent-only sites which are #20, #21, and #22.
  • Each campsite includes a picnic table, fire ring, bathrooms, showers, drinking water… oh, and spectacular views. Some of the campsites offer partial RV hookups.
  • The Atlatl Rock campground is the only campground at the Valley of Fire that offers all campers in the park restrooms with flush toilets, running water, and showers.

Click here to read more about Atlatl Rock Campground.

Arch Rock Campground

Located within the Valley of Fire State Park, Arch Rock Campground has 29 campsites for tents and trailers. 

Note, during the low camping season at the Valley of Fire, this campground may be closed as it is normally open between September and May during the busier month but if the Atlatl Rock Campground fills up, the park may open as an overflow camping.

  • The campground is first-come-first-serve and you can stay up to 14 consecutive days.
  • The campsites at Arch Rock include drinking water, flush toilets, showers, and an RV dump station.
  • Most of the campsites have a shaded table, fire ring, and grate.

Click here to read more about the Arch Rock Campground.

RV

At Atlatl Rock Campground you will find RV camping at sites 23 – 44, which can accommodate RVs, trailers, and motorhomes up to 35′ long.

These sites have electric hookups, and you’ll find a dump station at the campsite’s entrance.

Tent Camping

You have lots of options if camping in a tent from either of the two first-come campgrounds, the group campsite, and dispersed camping outside of the park.

Group Camping

campground 3 valley of fire

There is a site for group camping behind the Beehives with 3 group campsites by reservation each accommodating up to 45 people, though parking is limited. These sites are available for overnight camping and picnicking by reservation only. Call the park for reservations. Click here to read more about group camping at the Valley of Fire.

Places to Stay

If camping at Valley of Fire isn’t an option for you, there are many hotels near Overton, NV to choose from in Las Vegas and North Las Vegas.

You can use the Stay 22 map below to see all the deals from hotel deal websites in one place or you can view on the individual sites by clicking on the links below:

Valley of Fire Picnics

There are numerous places to relax after your hike and enjoy a picnic. Most offer visitors a shaded table area and have nearby amenities such as a water spigot (Atlatl Rock), trash cans, and BBQ grills. 

All of the picnic areas at the Valley of Fire are wheelchair accessible.

Note: the Valley of Fire trail map shows a graphic that looks like it’s a picnic area at the Beehives but it is actually for use by group campers.

Below are the areas with covered and/or uncovered picnic areas:

  1. Atlatl Rock: Nearby you can explore petroglyphs before or after your picnic. Click here to read more about Atlatl Rock and here to read more about the Atlatl Rock Campground at the Valley of Fire.
  2. Balancing Rock (Visitors Center): Not really picnic tables at the point of interest Balancing Rock. The picnic area is small and is located at the Valley of Fire Visitors Center, you will find a few shaded picnic tables behind the building near the restrooms. Click here to read more about Balancing Rock at the Valley of Fire.
  3. Lone Rock: There is one “lone” picnic table, BBQ, and a trash can available for visitors. Visit at the right time of day for it to be shaded and have a quiet and private picnic to yourself. Nearby you can explore petroglyphs before or after your picnic. Click here to read more about the point of interest, Lone Rock at the Valley of Fire.
  4. Mouse’s Tank Trail: Step back in time across the street is the amazing Petroglyph Canyon via Mouse’s Tank Trail. This area offers visitors a larger shaded picnic area to enjoy along with the use of BBQ and trash cans.
  5. Rainbow Vista Trail: Click here to read more about the Rainbow Vista Trail at the Valley of Fire.
  6. Seven Sisters: Picnic tables are scattered among the rock formations so depending on the time of day certain tables may or may not be fully shaded. Click here to read more about the Seven Sisters at the Valley of Fire
  7. The Cabins: In my opinion, one of the more picturesque picnic spots at the Valley of Fire. The location includes a shaded table area, BBQ, trash cans, and vault bathrooms across the road. Nearby you can explore petroglyphs before or after your picnic. Click here to read more about The Cabins at Valley of Fire.
  8. White Domes: One of the more popular hikes and subsequently picnic area that fills quickly around lunchtime on the weekends, White Domes offers visitors restrooms, covered picnic tables, BBQ, and trash cans. Click here to read more about the White Domes trail at the Valley of Fire.


Valley of Fire Hiking

Valley of Fire State Park

There are numerous hikes that vary from a few 0.3 miles to almost 7 miles.

Below are the official and unofficial hikes and points of interest within the Valley of Fire State Park.

Valley of Fire Trails

  • Arrowhead Loop
  • Balancing Rock – 0.3 miles
  • Cabins Arch Loop
  • Charlie’s Spring Loop – 4.7 miles
  • Duck Rock
  • Elephant Rock Loop – 1.2 miles
  • Fire Canyon
  • Fire Canyon Wash
  • Fire Wave Trail (look for parking lot #3 on the map) – 1.2 miles round trip
  • Hidden Valley Loop
  • Magnesium Mine
  • Mouse’s Tank Trail – 0.7 miles
  • Natural Arches Trail – 2..5 miles
  • Neapolitan Trail
  • Old Arrowhead Road – 6.8 miles
  • Pastel (Pink) Canyon Trail
  • Petrified Logs Loop, East – 0.3 miles
  • Petrified Logs, West
  • Petroglyph Canyon Trail to Mouse’s Tank – 0.8 miles
  • Piano Rock Trail – 0.7 miles
  • Pinnacles Loop – 4.5 miles
  • Prospect Trail – 4.6 miles
  • Rainbow Vista Trail – 1.0 miles
  • St. Thomas Trail
  • The Pinnacles
  • Top of the World
  • Upper Magnesium Wash
  • White Domes Loop – 1.0 miles
  • Wilderness Loop

Permits

Wilderness permits are not required for any of the hiking trails at the Valley of Fire.

Points of Interest

Valley of Fire offers visitors an area to explore, photograph, and family picnics.

If you are not into hiking and camping, there are still a lot of sites that you can visit that are enjoyable and incredibly picturesque within a short walk from the parking lot.

  1. Valley of Fire Arches: There are many arches in the Valley of Fire State Park. Below are the ones which have been named and there are many which have not been named (or discovered). Click here for more information about Valley of Fire arches.
  2. Arch Rock: Arch Rock is a small 13′ x 8′ arch located near the Arch Rock Campground. The best time to photograph the Arch Rock is at sundown for sunsets through the arch. Click here to view the natural arches at Valley of Fire and here to read more about Arch Rock. Amenities include restrooms and campgrounds. Click here to read about Arch Rock.
  3. Atlatl Rock: Located near the west entrance of the Valley of Fire State Park you will find Atlatl Rock showcasing a collection of petroglyphs on large sandstone rocks. Amenities include parking, restrooms, a very short trail to get to the petroglyphs, and a 43-site campground. Click here to read the Atlatl Rock at the Valley of Fire overview.
  4. Balancing Rock: Balancing Rock is located near the Valley of Fire Visitors Center. From there, it is a short hike to see the rock formation. Click here to read the Balancing Rock overview.
  5. Beehives: The Beehives are a formation created by geologic cross-bedding, which means the layers were deposited over the years to form the formation you see today. The grooves in the “beehives” were formed when there was water or wind that moved the material as it was forming. Click here to read the Beehives at the Valley of Fire overview.
  6. Elephant Rock: An interesting rock formation that at the right angle, looks like an elephant. Click here to read the Elephant Rock overview.
  7. John J. Clark Memorial: Look for the “Historical Marker” sign when traveling on State Route 169 where you will find a turnout to park to view the monument approximately 150′ from the road to commemorate Sargent John J. Clark. Click here to read the John J. Clark Memorial overview.
  8. Lone Rock – Lone Rock is well… just that, a lone rock. I was expecting something more but it truly fits its name. If you are looking for a private picnic, this would be the place to do it. Click here to read the Lone Rock at the Valley of Fire overview.
  9. Piano Rock – Click here to read the Piano Rock at the Valley of Fire overview.
  10. Poodle Rock – A rock formation resembling a poodle located near the Arch Rock Campground. Click here to read more about Poodle Rock and the photos.
  11. Scenic Drive: Scenic Drive is a short two-mile half-paved and half-gravel loop that winds behind the Atlatl Rock Campground and Arch Rock Campground.
  12. Seven Sisters: Seven Sisters is a stop-off from the road and not a “hike.” Consisting of seven tall red sandstone boulders, Seven Sisters is a great place to stop for a picnic and take in the scenic desert views. There are several areas of covered and uncovered picnic tables and some of them have grills. To the right of the parking lot, there is a concrete walkway that will lead you to the restrooms. FYI for those looking for a unique wedding photo location, Seven Sisters at Valley of Fire State Park is one of the four permitted wedding locations within the park. Amenities include parking, picnic area, and restrooms, and are approved for wedding events (with proper permissions). Click here to read the Seven Sisters at the Valley of Fire overview.
  13. Silica Dome / Fire Canyon Overlook
  14. The Cabins: The Valley of Fire was one of the earliest locations to have been constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps by building three native sandstone cabins in 1934 for traveling tourists. Today, visitors can visit the preserved cabins to see a small cabin with a built-in fireplace and a window overlooking the valley. Click here to read The Cabins at the Valley of Fire overview.
  15. The Scream: Found at the Valley of Fire Visitor Center, the Scream is a rock formation that looks similar to the famous paintings by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch.

Valley of Fire Petroglyphs

Atlatl Rock Petroglyphs
There is an abundance of petroglyphs at the Valley of Fire dating back to approximately 3,000 years ago. Petroglyphs can be found in the following areas.

Wildlife at Valley of Fire

What is a Chuckwalla

Chuckwalla doing their business on the backside of Fire Wave.

There are several herds of Bighorn Sheep that roam through the park. Often they are seen at the group campground, the visitors center, and various trails. At night if you are lucky you may see a kit fox or too (along with hearing the howl of nearby coyotes). At the visitor center, there is an area where the Gambel’s Quail congregate to enjoy food and water. One of the cutest Antelope Ground Squirrels I have seen was near Atlatl Campground literally hanging out in the shrubs (or should I say on top).

See…, even though it’s in the middle of the desert, there are still lots of animals and gorgeous plants to be found everywhere. Go out and explore!!!

Click here to read our article on Desert Wildlife at the Valley of Fire.

Movies Filmed at Valley of Fire

White Domes Valley of Fire

Driving through the Valley of Fire and you think to yourself the scenery looks familiar?

Its probably because the Valley of Fire is a popular location for shooting automobile commercials, other commercial photography, and has provided a setting for the several films and television shows.

According to a sign at White Domes, the uniqueness of the park has become well known with over 45 commercial photo shoots every year.

Trekkies (or Trekkers) who explore the area may recognize the area of Silica Dome used for Star Trek fans as the site of iconic starship captain James T. Kirk’s death and burial.

Below are the movies that we know about that used the Valley of Fire as their unique landscape to film.

  • Airwolf
  • Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery
  • Ballad of Cable Hogue
  • Beer
  • Bells of San Angelo
  • Billion Dollar Threat
  • Bite the Bullet
  • Breakdown
  • Casino
  • Cherry 2000
  • Con Air
  • Confessions of a Hitman
  • Criss Angel Mindfreak
  • Domino
  • Duets
  • Father Hood
  • Fools Rush In
  • Helderado
  • Hell’s Angels 1969
  • Iron Eagle
  • Just Visiting
  • Kill Me Again
  • Kiss of Fire
  • Love Among Thieves
  • Mission: Africa
  • Nightwing
  • One Million BC
  • Return of the Man from U.N.C.L.E.
  • Roadside Prophets
  • Roadtrek 2011
  • Seven Ways from Sundown
  • Sheriff of Las Vegas
  • Solar Crisis
  • Star Trek Generations – The scenes from planet Veridian III from Star Trek Generations were filmed here in 1994. The Silica Dome is particularly highlighted for Star Trek fans as the site of iconic starship captain James T. Kirk’s death and burial.
  • Stir Crazy
  • The Beastmaster
  • The Electric Horseman – Released in 1976, The Electric Horseman was produced by Universal Studios and stars Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, and Willie Nelson. Sonny Steele used to be a rodeo star, but his next appearance is to be on a Las Vegas stage, wearing a suit covered in lights, advertising a breakfast cereal. When he finds out they are going to drug the horse in case it’s too frisky, he rides off into the desert…
  • The Good Son
  • The Hitcher
  • The Professionals – The Professionals with Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, and Claudia Cardinale was filmed in 1966. In this rip-roaring Western classic, four soldiers of fortune seek out an oil baron’s kidnapped wife. Nominated for three Academy Awards. Valley of Fire was one of three locations used in the film. All that remains of the set is a portion of a rock wall of a hacienda.
  • The Stalking Moon
  • The Stand
  • They Ran for Their Lives
  • Total Recall – The outside Mars scenes from Total Recall, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, were almost totally shot in Valley of Fire.
  • Transformers
  • Viva Las Vegas – Viva Las Vegas starring Elvis Presley had multiple shots filmed in the park during the racing scenes for the film’s finale in 1963.

Drones at Valley of Fire State Park

valley of fire drones

I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to be able to fly a drone at the Valley of Fire. But, unfortunately, it is against the Nevada State Park Rules. It would be a dream if they would do a drone day at the Valley of Fire for visitors to have a time they are allowed to explore the valley from above! 

Think twice before you launch your drone at Valley of Fire, click here for the Nevada State Park FAQ

NOTE: All drone footage found on our website was done in accordance with
local, state, and federal laws. We always acquire special use permits to fly
our drones in restricted areas. Also, we follow the leave no trace
and do not interrupt wildlife during our filming.

Stargazing at Valley of Fire

Valley of Fire Star GazingAre you into stargazing? If not, learn more about Stargazing in the Southwest.

Once you step away from the bright lights of The Strip in Las Vegas, you will find a dark sky lit with millions of brilliant stars. Check the EVENTS page on the Valley of Fire website to see if there are stargazing events held by the park or through the Las Vegas Astronomical Society, as they will hold an event at the park too. Once I explore the park more and figure out the best places to stargaze, I will update this article. 

NOTE: Driving through the park after sunset is considered trespassing unless you are going back to your campsite.

Fireworks

Valley of Fire Fireworks

A big open sky with no ambient light from The Strip would be a perfect place for some fireworks… right? WRONG. Fireworks are not allowed at the Valley of Fire in accordance with the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) governing the state parks and other recreation parks.

[NAC-407 Revised Date: 9-14] CHAPTER 407 – STATE PARKS AND OTHER RECREATIONAL AREAS

NAC 407.101 Fireworks and explosives. (NRS 407.0475407.065) No person may possess or discharge within or into any portion of a park any firecracker or other fireworks, or explosives. (Added to NAC by Div. of St. Parks, 12-31-85, eff. 1-1-86)

The Moapa Paiute Reservation offers firework sales to customers and also offers a safe site to shoot them off for your enjoyment.

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References Used

Valley of Fire State Park

Witaminy dla Nastolatków

Saturday 11th of May 2024

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Monday 19th of February 2024

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